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AM I TOO OLD?

Jessica KuipersThe answer is NO! When it comes to exercise and strengthening, I have heard this question countless times from my elderly patients. They think, that because, they are in their later stages of life, strength training won’t be beneficial. That is far from the truth! Yes, with aging comes a loss of muscle (called Sarcopenia) and consequently a decrease in strength. There are a number of reasons why we lose muscle as we age, but the big question is, can we gain strength in our later years? The answer is YES!

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%AM, %22 %681 %2018 %11:%Aug

Lets talk about Pickleball

Emily Dudzik

As a Physical Therapist and a relatively new pickleball enthusiast, I am often asked by patients to explain this game with the funny name. Pickleball is a sport that combines aspects of tennis, badminton and ping-pong. It is played indoors or outdoors on a court slightly smaller than the size of a tennis court, using a paddle and a wiffle type ball.  Pickleball can be played as singles or doubles and is a sport that is enjoyed by individuals of all ages and skill levels.

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Anne Slater 4As an athletic trainer, I find that a lot of my patients/student-athletes don’t fully understand human anatomy and terminology. It’s usually easier to recover from an injury when you understand the “why,” behind treatments, restrictions and recovery time. Today, I wanted to tackle some common misnomers/misconceptions with terminology in the medical field, specifically those that relate to sports injuries. There is a lot of basic first aid and even emergency medical techniques that could almost be considered common knowledge. For example, most laymen know what the Heimlich maneuver is, and even how to perform it. However, there are a lot of terms that are often misused or misapplied to certain injuries. I wanted to try to clear some of these up and provide the correct terminology to improve communication between patients and their healthcare providers.

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Hannah DeClarkAre you sitting down? We have something important to tell you. Do you sit all day for your job? It is estimated that 86% of Americans spend the majority of their work day sitting. If you come home and watch television or relax on the couch, then you are spending additional time sitting. The average American can spend up to 10-13 hours a day sitting.

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Kurtis CarrollEarly specialization in one sport has become a trend in youth athletes across the country. This shift is one that has young athletes training year round to develop a specialized skill be able to play at the highest level of competition. This new thought that one must train for one sport only to be and compete with the best comes from parents, coaches, social media and the players themselves. The psychological component plays a role as parents push for scholarships and players desire to be the best in their respective sports without understanding that early specialization could be more harmful than helpful.

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Healthy Habits and How to Start

26198189 10155914169633076 5165533344898891151 oA habit is described as a behavior or action that becomes automatic. We create habits all the time, some are good like brushing our teeth first thing in the morning, choosing a salad for lunch, or lacing up your tennis shoes for a morning run. Habits can also be bad, like staying up too late and not getting enough rest, cigarette smoking or overeating. These repeated patterns become hard to change. They actually are etched into our neural pathways. In fact, almost 45% of our time spent awake is performing behaved actions – why? Because our body is an amazing machine and wants to be as energy efficient as possible. But we also know that they are choices and thus are able to change. Through repetition, we can form new habits, therefore improving lifestyle choices and ultimately creating healthier habits.

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Pain as a Guide

Chad MorrisIf you are like me, sports are a big part of my life. I love watching sports, playing sports, and helping my kids with sporting activities. I work with athletes of all ages, and eventually we get to the point where that client feels they may be ready to start back to their sport. It does not matter if they were injured playing the sport they love, or something else has disrupted them being able to participate. The questions start coming out, “Am I ready? Will I be okay doing this again? How will I know if I am doing damage?”

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Joe ChiaramonteWith a sports medicine career spanning 20 years (20 as a Certified Athletic Trainer-ATC and 6 as a Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist-CSCS), I have come across thousands of student athletes with many different injuries, medical conditions, surgical rehabilitations and performance levels. I have come to realize that student-athletes are very different from 1998 to 2018.

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%AM, %16 %668 %2018 %11:%May

Injury: The Dark Horse Opponent

PatrickLawrenceInjuries are not fun: inconvenient, unpredictable, emotionally and physically painful. They are dreaded by athletes and recreationalists of every skill and every competitive level. Their apparent negative effect is on the physical body, but because a physical injury can interrupt the pursuit of athletic goals, they can greatly impact mental well-being. It is easy to give in to frustration and disappointment and a whole heap of negative emotions because of an injury. But only if we let it.

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Hillary DummondAs technology continues to advance, the use of devices such as phones, tablets and laptop computers has increased drastically among all ages. For the majority, this viewing is done in poor posture, with head tilted and shoulders rolled forward. Although viewing these devices is likely the most consistent contributor to potentially damaging posture, other day to day activities have a similar affect. Driving, carrying heavy objects and sitting for extended periods are frequently conducted with less than ideal posture. The trouble with this is the disruption to normal muscle function that occurs as a result. Muscles of the neck, shoulders and back are the primary groups affected. As a result, muscles become tight and off balance, leading to pain and weakness at the affected site. Over time poor posture can lead to a very negative lasting impact on the body.

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