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The Fight Against Parkinson’s

BalanceVestibularRehab 550x450 3I was struggling to come up with a blog topic this time around.  It seems as if I always come back to balance-related topics; whether it’s balancing your body through diet or exercise.  So here you have it, another discussion on balance!  This one in particular was very inspiring to me and hopefully will inspire you or someone you know as well.

I woke up Sunday morning and found myself hooked watching a special on CBS Sunday Morning (not a show I typically watch).  This episode was regarding a specific treatment called Rock Steady Boxing for those battling Parkinson’s Disease.  

Earlier in my schooling and career I performed research, had publications and became certified as an LSVT-BIG therapist for management of Parkinson’s Disease.  While watching this video on CBS, I couldn’t help but compare it to my background knowledge in Parkinson’s and training in LSVT-BIG, which closely resembles many of the treatment principles used in Rock Steady Boxing.

Published in Blog
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You Have to Move to Improve

You have to move to improve. For some people, especially those having chronic or persistent pain, this is easier said than done. Sometimes a person has so much pain they are unable to participate in everyday activities. There are, however, some techniques out there to help these people. Immersion in warm water as well as breathing, relaxation, meditation, laughter and music may help to calm the central nervous system allowing people with persistent pain to improve their quality of life.

Pain is a warning system designed to protect us and to make us react to danger or potential danger.  When nerves are stimulated, chemicals are released and transmitted to the spinal cord and brain. Pain only exists when the brain concludes the body is in danger and action is required. All pain is generated by the brain. All pain is real. In people who have persistent pain, it is the potential for tissue damage that the brain is concerned with.  The result is an over sensitive central nervous system. Pain then becomes restrictive, not protective.

The good news is that a hyper sensitive, over-responsive pain alarm system can be retrained with relaxation, breathing techniques and exercise. Laughter can also be a great tool in breaking through some of the restrictions that pain can create. A lesser known fact is that laughter promotes healthier blood vessels. Artery diameter increases by 22% during laughter and is decreased by 35% during mental stress. Also, by performing exercise in warm water a person with persistent pain may be able to help calm this overactive central nervous system. Here are some of the benefits of warm water exercise.

  • Gravity is reduced /eliminated depending on the depth of the water
  • When movement stops, the workload immediately stops
  • Pain, stiffness and muscle guarding are reduced
  • The touch, temperature and pressure of the water will compete with the pain signals going to the brain
  • Repetitive and comfortable movement helps to normalize input to the brain
  • Balance, core strength, stability and gait can be comfortably retrained using the water as an external support

According to the American Chronic Pain Association, chronic pain is the #1 cause of adult disability and affects 50 million people in the United States. If you are one of these people you may want to try some of the techniques listed above to help you deal with your pain and improve your quality of life.

Aquatic Therapy Rehab Institute Chronic Pain Specialty Course

Published in Blog
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Are You a Well-Balanced Individual?


Can you stand on one leg without falling over? If not, we’ve got a lot of work to do.  If so, that’s great.  But let’s try challenging you a bit.  How about standing on one leg while turning your head from right to left, or closing your eyes.  Too easy?  Try doing those activities while standing on a pillow or unstable surface.  If you are truly a balance master, make it even more challenging by adding some trunk, arm or opposite leg movements and see if you’re still standing.

Published in Blog